DCMS blog

Communications Review – the next phase

by

Henry Anderton

Member of The Department Comms Review Team

Despite perhaps starting this week suffering from a minor case of what a colleague described as ‘POD’ (Post-Olympics Depression), we’re all extremely excited about the forthcoming Paralympic Games, and across Whitehall our colleagues will be looking to deliver something equally as successful and memorable as the games that have just finished.


In terms of the Communications Review, we’re also looking ahead to a couple of important milestones in the near future:
First, we’ve confirmed that the Radio seminar will be taking place on the 13 September, and will be chaired by Ed Vaizey. This will follow a similar round-table format to the spectrum session he chaired in July. The invitations have gone out, and although unfortunately we will necessarily have to limit the numbers who can attend, we’re very grateful for the interest shown in taking part. As before, these sessions are not the start and finish of the conversations with stakeholders, and as well as the video and transcript of the sessions, there are other ways to contribute – via the commentable papers online, or via a more formal submission.
Second, today marks one month to go until the deadline for responses to the first four seminar papers. Thank you to those who have already submitted their responses and views – be it online, via twitter (#commsreview) or to our dedicated communications.review@culture.gsi.gov.uk inbox. We will of course continue to closely monitor these responses, whatever means is used to convey them to us.
On the subject of twitter, and I’m sure he won’t mind the plug, the DCMS Permanent Secretary Jonathan Stephens has entered the twittersphere – @jstephensdcms – and has been giving regular updates on the many strands of the department’s work (and in particular the breadth of activity over the course of the games this summer) – it’s well worth following.
In addition, he also mentioned the recent rescue of his dog from a river by two Australian Olympians who were training nearby, a story which also made the local press. ‘The curious incident of the dog in the daytime?’ No, perhaps not…
– The Communications Review team

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